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Caruana sigue su camino de victorias : esta vez la víctima fue Aronian

Caruana sigue su camino de victorias : esta vez la víctima fue Aronian

El líder del torneo no lo dice, pero está en la mente de todos: ¿se lucha por el 2º puesto en San Luis? Caruana sigue aplastando a sus rivales. Hoy jugó una hermosa partida, que supuso la segunda derrota consecutiva para el armenio. Segundo está Vachier-Lagrave, con 2/4 y medio punto más que el resto. Reportaje y partidas… por Alejandro Ramírez
sinquefield00a

Copa Sinquefield 2014

Ronda 4

30 de agosto de 2014
Vachier-Lagrave, M 2768
½-½
Nakamura, Hikaru 2787
Carlsen, Magnus 2877
½-½
Topalov, Veselin 2772
Caruana, Fabiano 2801
1-0
Aronian, Levon 2805
Las partidas:

[Event "Sinquefield Cup 2014"]
[Site "St Louis, Mo"]
[Date "2014.08.30"]
[Round "4.1"]
[White "Caruana, Fabiano"]
[Black "Aronian, Levon"]
[Result "1-0"]
[ECO "C84"]
[WhiteElo "2801"]
[BlackElo "2805"]
[Annotator "Finegold"]
[PlyCount "99"]
[EventDate "2014.??.??"]
[SourceDate "2014.01.04"]

1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 a6 4. Ba4 Nf6 5. O-O Be7 6. d3 {Aronian is the
world's leading authority on the Marshall Gambit, so Fabiano wisely avoids
this sharp variation for quieter waters.} b5 7. Bb3 O-O 8. Nc3 d6 9. a3 Na5 10.
Ba2 Be6 11. Bxe6 fxe6 12. b4 Nc6 13. Bd2 d5 14. Re1 Qd6 {Diagram #} 15. Na2 {
Caruana prepared this idea for this game with his well-known coach Chuchelov.
White wants to eventually get his knight to c5 (or a5) via c1-b3.} Nd7 16. Qe2
d4 $2 {This is just strategically wrong. Levon is not playing his best the
last two days. Now that there is no pressure on the center, and things are
locked, white can try his hand on the kingside (and queenside!).} 17. Reb1 Nb6
18. Nc1 Na4 19. Nb3 Rf7 (19... Nc3 20. Bxc3 dxc3 {is black's best chance. As
the game proceeds, black has very little play.}) 20. Rc1 Rd8 21. Ng5 $1 Rf6 $2
{As Fabiano pointed out after the game, once his king roams free on the
kingside, black is in a bad way.} (21... Bxg5 22. Bxg5 Rdf8 $14) 22. Qh5 $1 h6
$6 (22... Rh6 23. Qf7+ Kh8 24. Qf3 Bxg5 25. Bxg5 Rf8 {is better was for black
to play than in the game.}) 23. Nf3 Rdf8 24. Rf1 R8f7 $2 {Now the Rf6 is more
or less trapped.} 25. Rae1 Bf8 26. h3 g6 27. Qh4 Qe7 28. Qg3 Bg7 {Diagram #}
29. Na5 $1 {The start of an amazing concept.} Nxa5 30. Nxe5 $3 {Diagram # Very
creative play by Caruana. Black simply has no counterplay and white has too
much for the sacrificed piece.} Nb7 31. Nxg6 (31. Nxf7 $2 Qxf7 $14) 31... Qd8
32. e5 Rf5 33. f4 c5 {Levon gets tired of being puched around and fights back.
But it's too late.} 34. Nh4 Rh5 35. Nf3 {The Rh5 is badly placed and white's
kingside majority rolls home.} Kh7 36. Qg4 Rhf5 37. Nh4 Kh8 38. Nxf5 Rxf5 (
38... exf5 39. Qg6 {attacking Rf7 and Pa6 is also hopeless for black.}) 39. Qg6
Qe7 40. g4 Rf8 41. f5 Qe8 42. Qxe8 Rxe8 43. f6 Bf8 44. f7 Re7 45. Rf6 Nb6 46.
Bxh6 Nd7 47. Ref1 $1 {Fabiano continues to play the most accurate way.} cxb4 (
47... Nxf6 48. Bxf8 Rxf7 49. Rxf6 $18) 48. axb4 Bxh6 49. Rxh6+ Kg7 50. Rh5 1-0

[Event "Sinquefield Cup 2014"]
[Site "St Louis, Mo"]
[Date "2014.08.30"]
[Round "4.2"]
[White "Carlsen, Magnus"]
[Black "Topalov, Veselin"]
[Result "1/2-1/2"]
[ECO "E21"]
[WhiteElo "2877"]
[BlackElo "2772"]
[Annotator "Finegold"]
[PlyCount "126"]
[EventDate "2014.??.??"]
[SourceDate "2014.01.04"]

1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 e6 3. Nc3 Bb4 4. Nf3 b6 5. Bd2 $5 {An unusual way to fight for
an advantage.} Bb7 6. g3 c5 7. dxc5 Bxc5 8. Bg2 O-O 9. O-O Be7 10. Bf4 Na6 11.
Nb5 d5 12. Ne5 Nc5 13. Rc1 a6 14. Nc3 dxc4 {Diagram # White has nothing from
the opening and the game is completely equal. Normally, this is where Magnus
outplays his opponents, but, thus far, not in this event.} 15. Bxb7 Nxb7 16.
Qxd8 Raxd8 17. Nc6 $5 {Magnus does not want the equality offered by 17.Nxc4}
Rde8 $5 (17... Rd7 18. Ne5 Rdd8 $11) 18. Rfd1 {Both sides decide to play for a
win. Now Topalov is ahead a pawn, but his Rf8 is out of play and white may
want to play Be5xf6 and penetrate with Rd7.} h6 19. e4 Bc5 $1 20. e5 {Diagram #
} Nd5 $1 {Topalov plays very accurately and maintains equality by giving back
the pawn.} 21. Nxd5 exd5 22. Rxd5 b5 $5 (22... Re6 23. Nd4 Bxd4 24. Rxd4 b5 $11
) 23. Be3 $1 Bxe3 24. fxe3 Re6 25. Nd4 Rb6 26. b3 Rc8 27. Kg2 {Diagram #} Rc5
$1 {This temporary pawn sacrifice ensures black has no difficulties.} 28. Rxc5
Nxc5 29. bxc4 bxc4 30. Rxc4 Nd3 31. Rc8+ Kh7 32. e6 fxe6 33. Kf3 Kg6 {Now the
game is just a draw. But Magnus goes a little too far and things get
interesting!} 34. a4 e5 35. Nc6 Kf5 36. g4+ (36. e4+ Ke6 37. Nb8 a5 38. Rc6+
Rxc6 39. Nxc6 Nb2 40. Nxa5 Nxa4 $11) 36... Ke6 37. a5 Rb5 38. Rd8 $2 (38. Rg8
Kd6 39. Nd8 Ke7 40. Nc6+ Kd6 $11) 38... Nc5 39. h4 Rb1 40. Rg8 Kd6 {Time
control was reached and only Topalov can play for a win now!} 41. Nb8 e4+ 42.
Kg2 Rb2+ 43. Kf1 Rb5 44. Kf2 $6 (44. Ke2 Kc7 (44... Ne6 45. Nxa6 Rxa5 46. Nb4
Rb5 47. Nc2 $11 {And the Ke2 makes all the difference (with the Kf2, as played
in the game, now 47...Rb2 wins)}) 45. Nxa6+ Nxa6 46. Rxg7+ Kc8 47. g5 $11)
44... Ne6 45. Rc8 Rxa5 (45... Rc5 {People got excited when they saw the
computer evals, but this is also a draw...} 46. Rxc5 Nxc5 47. h5 Kc7 48. Nxa6+
Nxa6 49. Kg3 $11) 46. Rc6+ Kd5 47. Rxa6 Rxa6 48. Nxa6 Kc6 49. Nb4+ Kc5 50. Nc2
Kc4 51. Ke2 g5 52. hxg5 hxg5 53. Kd2 {White needs to be careful, but this is
an easy draw for Magnus.} Nc5 54. Na3+ Kb4 55. Nc2+ Kc4 56. Na3+ Kd5 57. Nb5
Nd7 58. Nc3+ Ke5 59. Nd1 Nf6 60. Nf2 Kd5 61. Nh3 Nxg4 62. Nxg5 Nxe3 63. Nxe4
Ke5 1/2-1/2

[Event "Sinquefield Cup 2014"]
[Site "St Louis, Mo"]
[Date "2014.08.30"]
[Round "4.3"]
[White "Vachier-Lagrave, Maxime"]
[Black "Nakamura, Hikaru"]
[Result "1/2-1/2"]
[ECO "C78"]
[WhiteElo "2768"]
[BlackElo "2787"]
[Annotator "Finegold"]
[PlyCount "60"]
[EventDate "2014.??.??"]
[SourceDate "2014.01.04"]

1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 a6 4. Ba4 Nf6 5. O-O b5 6. Bb3 Bc5 7. c3 d6 8. d4
Bb6 {Hikaru had a good position yesterday against Topalov with this line.} 9.
Be3 O-O 10. Nbd2 {Hikaru beat Anand last year with 10....Re8, but, perhaps
smelling a rat, deviates with another common move.} h6 11. h3 Bb7 12. Re1 exd4
13. cxd4 Na5 $5 {Very unusual! Nakamura confused another game he saw in this
line without the moves h6 and Re1. Black almost always plays 13...Nb4 here
with Benoni-like ideas of c5.} 14. Bc2 Re8 15. Qb1 Nc4 16. Nxc4 bxc4 17. Nd2 {
Diagram #} Rb8 $1 18. Nxc4 Bxe4 19. Bxe4 Rxe4 20. Qd3 Qe8 {Both sides have
played well until this point. Now MVL breaks one of my most important rules
and throws away any possible advantage! Never play f3!} 21. f3 $5 (21. Nxb6
Rxb6 22. b3 {is probably about equal as well.}) 21... Re6 22. Bf2 Nd5 23. Rxe6
Qxe6 {Diagram #} 24. Re1 $6 {This inacurrate move leads to a draw. If white
wants to push for an edge, he needs to defend his knight with b3.} Nf4 $1 25.
Qc2 Qd5 (25... Qg6 26. Qxg6 fxg6 $11) 26. Re4 Ne6 27. Qc3 c5 28. Nxb6 Rxb6 29.
dxc5 dxc5 30. b3 Rd6 {Not the most exciting game of the round, but Hikaru easy
held equality in a rare line.} 1/2-1/2


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